World Rugby urged to follow rugby league’s lead in adopting enhanced concussion protocols | Rugby Union News

Rugby Football League has extended return-to-play protocols, which means that players who fail concussion tests in matches or during training must now wait at least 11 days before playing again; that is, for seven days while in elite rugby the minimum requirement remains at six

Last updated: 01/10/22 17:36


Rugby union players who fail the concussion tests can currently return to action after a minimum of six days

World Rugby has been urged to follow rugby league’s lead in fighting to reduce the effect of repeated headers.

Rugby Football League has extended return-to-play protocols, meaning players who fail concussion tests in matches or during training must now wait at least 11 days before playing again.

This has increased from seven days while in elite rugby the minimum requirement remains at six.

Progressive Rugby, a lobby group formed to lead the bid to tackle severe head and brain injuries, hopes the move will prompt 15-man code officials to take similar action.

Progressive Rugby is urging World Rugby to change their protocols

Progressive Rugby is urging World Rugby to change their protocols

Professor Bill Ribbans, on behalf of Progressive Rugby, said: “We applaud the RFL for addressing the game’s Graduated Return to Play (GRTP) protocol and for sending a strong message that playing a contact sport within one week. from concussion is no longer acceptable.

“At World Rugby, we reiterate our call for an initial amendment to the GRTP so that players are discharged for a minimum period of 12 days and we hope that the RFL’s decision can provide the impetus to do so.”

Former England forward James Haskell, a prominent member of the group, added on social media: “Well done rugby league! Turns out you can make instant changes. Come on @WorldRugby.

“Three times a tick. If you want to put me in charge, I’ll show you how to change everything in a few days.”

In July 2021, the Rugby Football Union, the Premiership Rugby and the Rugby Players’ Association launched an action plan aimed at reducing head impacts and concussion risk in elite rugby union matches and training.

The action plan set out how science and technology would be used to evolve thinking to optimize player well-being and brain health for potential, current and past players.

An action plan was launched in July 2021 to reduce head impacts and concussion risk in the English rugby union

An action plan was launched in July 2021 to reduce head impacts and concussion risk in the English rugby union

Increased focus on head impact exposure has flanked work to improve the standard of head impact and concussion management within professional play and the introduction of a new health assessment service. brain for elite male and female retired players.

The plans included the use of “smart mouthguards” for Premiership clubs during the 2021-22 and 2022-23 seasons, with the technology allowing staff to monitor head impacts in real time.

There has also been the implementation of World Rugby’s Graduated Return to Play protocols and reviews by independent concussion consultants, as well as the use of real-time Hawkeye videos to assist head injury assessments in the Women’s Premier 15 , as well as restarting saliva sample collection in the men’s game (and starting the women’s game).

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