The Ashes: England’s Stuart Broad ‘disappointed’ to miss first Test but will not ‘kick up a stink’ | Cricket News

“I was sorry not to play, but I realize this series is a marathon and not a sprint. Never have five tests been so grouped as this and it will be exhausting, so realistically I don’t think any crimpers will play all five,” says Broad while urging England to be smart in the pink ball test

Last updated: 12/12/21 7:32


Stuart Broad felt it could have a positive influence on The Gabba, but it won’t “suck” on its omission.

British seamer Stuart Broad believes he could have had “a positive influence” during the first Ashes Test, but it won’t “suck” on his omission from the game at The Gabba.

Longtime big and long teammate James Anderson was left out in Brisbane for a match that the tourists lost by nine wickets on day four, as they have been winless on the Queensland pitch since 1986.

England’s batting was the main reason for their defeat, with Joe Root’s men losing 147 on the first day after choosing to bat and then losing eight wickets in Saturday’s morning session to slip from their 220-2. overnight at 297 all out.

Mike Atherton defended the England team selection for the first Ashes Test stating it was

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Mike Atherton defended the selection of the English team for the first Ashes Test saying it was “completely understandable” to exclude Broad and James Anderson.

Mike Atherton defended the selection of the English team for the first Ashes Test saying it was “completely understandable” to exclude Broad and James Anderson.

Broad still believes he could have helped England in the opening of Ashes, but said there would be no repeat of his memorable TV interview with Sky Sports in the summer of 2020 when he expressed his frustration at being banned from the first. Test against the West Indies at The Bowl of Ageas.

The 35-year-old – who, along with Anderson, seems ready to return to England’s eleven for the Balloon Pink test in Adelaide from Thursday – wrote in Post on Sunday: “I put myself in a mindset where I was ready to go.

“I love Ashes cricket, I love bowling at the Gabba and I feel I could have had a positive influence on such a field.

“Of course, in my mind I was preparing 100% to play and that is especially important given my role. As a new bowling player, you have to tackle bowling, one of the most pressured deliveries in world sport.

“Over the past 12 months, Jimmy and I have been trying to make sure we are as fit as possible in the current Covid climate, ready to go and available for all five tests in Australia. I think we ticked that box, but the England selection is not. in the hands of the players.

“It is in those of the people who have to make choices based on the conditions and the balance of the team and our task now with four games to go is to be ready for the next one. [Test].

Nasser Hussain examines what changes England could make for the second Ashes Test in Adelaide

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Nasser Hussain examines what changes England could make for the second Ashes Test in Adelaide

Nasser Hussain examines what changes England could make for the second Ashes Test in Adelaide

“I was sorry not to play, but I also realize that this series is a marathon and not a sprint.

“There have never been five test games so grouped together as this one and it will be exhausting, so realistically I don’t think any seamer will play all five.

Broad hasn’t played an official match since August due to a calf injury with his ability to bowling under the belt hampered by rain that ruined most of England’s pre-Ashes warm-up matches.

“It would be wrong in this scenario to bring up a stink,” the paceman said.

“I have been sidelined on numerous occasions and at times it was a real surprise. This was less of a surprise, perhaps because I was not on the squad for the previous series against India due to a calf injury.”

Atherton states that a combination of

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Atherton says a combination of “bad luck and circumstances” has resulted in England being completely unprepared for the Ashes Open Test.

Atherton says a combination of “bad luck and circumstances” has resulted in England being completely unprepared for the Ashes Open Test.

Looking at the Adelaide test, Broad added: “There is no time to feel sorry for ourselves, stop not hitting, throwing or catching very well. We know this is the case.

“What we don’t have to do is bring down negatives with us for the next month. We’ve done that on past Ashes tours and have consistently lost. We have to pretend it’s 0-0 in a four-game streak and start over.

“Timing is very important in lighted Test matches. Conditions change very quickly at certain times, so you have to recognize and adapt.

Hussain says England batters need to give Joe Root more support after collapsing at Gabba again

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Hussain says England batters need to give Joe Root more support after collapsing at Gabba again

Hussain says England batters need to give Joe Root more support after collapsing at Gabba again

“That could mean pulling back your bowling stitchers in the twilight period when the batting tends to be more challenging, and therefore spinners and handymen have to do more work ahead of time.

“How much length is he going to hit the top of the stumps with that ball? We’ve seen when the Aussies have done damage with the pink ball in previous Adelaide matches, it has come from a slightly fuller length.

“There will also be times when you have to sit down. David Warner got a triple hundred in a pink ball game in Adelaide, so we can’t just think it will develop. We have to adapt faster than Australia with whatever is presented to us.” .

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