San Antonio DreamWeek designs highlight America’s cultural richness

The Brick at Blue Star Arts Complex filled with high-energy chatter from behind the curtains that would soon open to highlight the designs and fashion of local artists and entrepreneurs in front of around 50-60 spectators at the start of the Sunday evening.

In addition to showcasing local talent, the event also raised funds through voluntary donations for Uvalde’s El Progreso Memorial Library and DreamWeek, which celebrates its 10th year with over 200 events ending on January 30th. This year’s theme is “Our future. “

“DreamWeek focuses on tolerance, diversity and equality. But above all, it (offers) an environment for civic and civic engagement, “said founder Shokare” Sho “Nakpodia during the event.” The importance of DreamWeek is truly discovering the genius of humanity … We must give everyone has the opportunity to share their voice. And the voices can take the form of a fashion show “.

DreamWeek founder Shokare “Sho” Nakpodia speaks during a fundraising fashion show Sunday night at the Brick at Blue Star Arts Complex. The event was attended by designers from all over the region and also benefited from the El Progreso Memorial Library in Uvalde.

Robin Jerstad / Contributor

DreamWeek events kicked off last week in downtown San Antonio, and fashion lovers from across the region gathered this week at the Brick at the Blue Star Arts Complex to see a parade of garments reflecting the title of the event. “Fashion Lifestyles: Past, Present, Future.”

Lorena Auguste, also known as Lady Lyria, is the owner of Lady Lyria’s Fashion Consulting and was the main organizer who hosted and directed the event. It was originally planned to hold about 100 participants, but due to the spread of the omicron variant, the number of participants was reduced to 50-60 to observe social distancing needs, Auguste said.

DreamWeek’s purpose has merged perfectly with the purpose of the fashion shows it has been organizing for years. The idea, Auguste said, is to promote social tolerance by understanding ourselves better and coming to terms with the fact that our differences are what makes America so interesting.

Models walk the runway and pose during a DreamWeek fundraiser fashion show Sunday night at the Brick at Blue Star Arts Complex. The event was attended by designers from all over the region and also benefited from the El Progreso Memorial Library in Uvalde.

Models walk the runway and pose during a DreamWeek fundraiser fashion show Sunday night at the Brick at Blue Star Arts Complex. The event was attended by designers from all over the region and also benefited from the El Progreso Memorial Library in Uvalde.

Robin Jerstad / Contributor

Through his projects, Auguste, 38, aims to channel his roots and those of his parents, which stretch back to Spain, Mexico, Jamaica, Haiti and Africa.

“I decided to choose fabrics that were synonymous with those cultures,” Auguste said. “This will be a reflection of so many lifestyles. We are Americans, yes, but we are not all the same … this is what makes America so interesting. “

Six local designers, entrepreneurs and around 25 models joined the call, including designer Maya Ford, the youngest of the group at 15, Jeremy William, Delores Unique Designs and Pat Moore of NV-US Fashion Boutique.

From classic styles inspired by My Fair Lady to modern and even futuristic leather looks, their designs featured bold ideas, patterns, colors, all representative and inspired by their backgrounds and the cultural richness of their history.

The night filled with music, flashing lights, photos and art would end that evening with a network and a mixer. But even beyond the night, audiences were encouraged to follow their favorite designer and even donate to the cause in person or online.

“Why can’t fashion have a purpose?” Augusto asked. “The truth is, it can have a purpose – that’s why nonprofits and philanthropy work so well with the arts and creativity.”

danya.perez@express-news.net | @DanyaPH

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