Adam Peaty: British swimmer targets ‘project immortal’ after retaining Olympic 100m breaststroke title in Tokyo | Swimming News

Peaty and his coach Mel Marshall developed “Project Immortal” and he believes that setting tough goals is what keeps him motivated to raise his level; Peaty failed to get close to his world record at the Tokyo Olympics, but he believes the Covid outages have impacted that.

Last updated: 25/12/21 12:14

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World champion swimmer Adam Peaty talks to Jacquie Beltrao about his goals and why the block made him question what he was doing for the first time in his life

World champion swimmer Adam Peaty talks to Jacquie Beltrao about his goals and why the block made him question what he was doing for the first time in his life

Adam Peaty, two-time Olympic 100m breaststroke champion, became the first British swimmer to defend an Olympic title when he won in Tokyo and is already the favorite to win gold again in Paris 2024.

But winning another gold medal (and he’s 31) won’t be his only goal over the next three years: “Project Immortal” is the goal he and his coach Mel Marshall have set for themselves; in other words, setting a time that can never be beaten.

It’s been done before in athletics, but some of these achievements have big question marks next to them; Marita Koch’s record of 47.60, for example, was set in 1985 and is still standing (no one has even come close) but is believed to have been part of the East German-sponsored anti-doping program, although it hasn’t never failed a drug test and he always claimed he did nothing wrong.

So legitimately setting a time that stands the test of all time is a huge question.

Peaty retained the Olympic 100m breaststroke title in Tokyo

Peaty retained the Olympic 100m breaststroke title in Tokyo

But Peaty feels he needs to set tough goals to stay motivated.

“Making a time that can never be beat … the next three years is how we achieve Project Immortal,” he says.

“More than ever we have to attack. I know where I have to be to get to Project Immortal.”

He does not hide the fact that he is not friends with his competitors and is committed to cutting them out.

“It must be the war,” he says. “You have to treat them as if they are taking something away from you because they are.

“The red fog for me is my super strength. I can use my anger to the nth degree, I can overcome barriers that no one else can overcome.

“I don’t know where I got it from – it’s like a fight or flight response.”

Peaty failed to break his own world record at the Tokyo Olympics

Peaty failed to break his own world record at the Tokyo Olympics

Like many athletes, Peaty admits that he really struggled with the block and postponement of the Tokyo Olympics by one year.

“Entering 2021 was tough,” he says, “because my mindset was prepared for last year.

“There was a lot more pressure and a lot more relief when it paid off, but it cost me a lot to get there in terms of motivation and commitment.

“I wondered why I was doing it and I never question it: this is what I love. But when you do it without gratification, without winning gold medals, that’s when you start asking yourself ‘why’.

“That was the hardest thing: beating me.”

Peaty is a three-time Olympic gold medalist

Peaty is a three-time Olympic gold medalist

He hasn’t come close to his world record in Tokyo and for that he blames the entire year for Covid and all the restrictions that came with it.

But he still hit the wall first, and even though his friends and family couldn’t be there to share the moment, he says he’s just grateful that the Olympics happened.

“I’m just grateful that he moved on because if he didn’t it would be done forever,” he says. “I’m glad it moved on and I was able to create something and inspire people.”

Now little George’s dad, and more of a household name due to a post-Olympic training break he took part in on Strictly, his life has obviously changed a lot since his first Olympic gold medal in Rio, which he writes about. in his new autobiography, but he still has his eyes on the prize.

“Obviously Paris is on the cards and I hope that if I get what I want there, then it’s LA 2028,” he says.

“If I can do what I do there, then I don’t know. I’m already living my childhood dream, so that would be my ‘man’ dream.”

Peaty looks to the 2024 Olympics in Paris

Peaty looks to the 2024 Olympics in Paris

Right now, the 26-year-old doesn’t see why those dreams need an end point.

“I’m not going to let anyone say, just because I’ve reached a certain age that I’m no longer a good swimmer – it doesn’t make sense,” he says.

“The reason I’m the fastest swimmer in the world is because I thought differently.

“2028 would take me to 14 as a professional athlete – a career of 30 years. I agree, why not?

“Another seven years to set a time that no one can ever beat and achieve sporting immortality, in the right way.”

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